Jewellery Glossary

1

  • 10k: 41.7% pure gold, 58.3% alloy. More affordable option, but less resistant to scratches.
  • 14k: 58.5% pure gold, 41.5% alloy. Offers a good balance of price, durability, and shine.
  • 18k: 75% pure gold, 25% alloy. Exquisite luster and high value, but more prone to wear and tear.

2

  • 24k gold represents the highest standard of purity, exceeding 99.95% pure gold with minimal alloy content.

A

  • A Jour: An openwork setting showcasing the hidden beauty of the stone’s facets.
  • Abalone: A shimmering treasure born within the depths of a seashell.
  • Abraded Culet: A chipped or scratched gem, whispering tales of a life well-lived.
  • Abrasion: A faint mark on a stone, a reminder of its journey through time.
  • Accent: A jewelry piece or design feature crafted to redirect focus to another central point of interest.
  • Agate: A kaleidoscope of colors, captured in a single stone.
  • AGS: American Gem Society: Guardians of quality, ensuring the highest standards.
  • Aigrette: A feather’s embrace, adorned with a jewel’s grace.
  • Alexandrite: A chameleon of color, shifting with the light’s caress.
  • Alloy: A union of metals, forging strength and beauty anew.
  • Aluminum: A lightweight and malleable silver/white metallic element..
  • Amazonite: Is a variety of feldspar characterized by its opaque appearance.
  • Amber: A time capsule of golden warmth, holding the sun’s ancient fire.
  • Amethyst: A crystallized quartz variety displaying hues of clear purple, blue, or violet.
  • Amulet: A shield of magic, whispered with protective charms.
  • Anneal: To temper and strengthen, forging resilience into form.
  • Anniversary Band: An anniversary band typically refers to a ring, often an eternity band, given to mark and celebrate a special anniversary.
  • Anodized: A metamorphosis of metal, bathed in an electric embrace.
  • Antique: A whispered echo of the past, holding stories yet untold.
  • Antiquing: Antiquing is a specialized technique used to age jewelry, adding a touch of timeworn charm and depth to metals like gold and silver.
  • Antwerp: Antwerp is globally esteemed for its mastery in diamond cutting, establishing itself as a premier hub for creating magnificent jewelry. The city’s exceptional skill lies in transforming exceptional diamonds into breathtaking, refined pieces of jewelry.
  • Appraisal: An appraisal is a professional assessment of a piece of jewelry’s monetary value, providing a detailed report for insurance purposes.
  • Aquamarine: A transparent blue or green stone, a variety of beryl known for its captivating aquatic hues.
  • Arabesque: Arabesque jewelry is characterized by intricate, flowing designs featuring curlicues and low relief. These designs are inspired by traditional Arabic and Moorish decoration, and feature intertwining, loose lines that create a beautiful, ornamental look.
  • Art Deco: Jewelry in the Art Deco style is characterized by its angular geometric shapes, zigzags, vibrant colors, molded or faceted Czech glass beads, plastics such as celluloid or Bakelite, and chrome. This style, also known as Arts Décoratifs or Deco, follows the Edwardian jewelry trend with its unique and eye-catching designs.
  • Art Nouveau: Art Nouveau jewelry is characterized by its graceful curves and organic motifs. This style of jewelry is often referred to as the “Modern Style” and is an international form of art, applied art, and decorative arts. Art Nouveau jewelry is known for its intricate designs and unique use of materials, making it a timeless and beautiful addition to any collection.
  • Articulated: Articulated Jewelry is a type of jewelry that features two or more components connected by a flexible joint, allowing for movement and flexibility. This type of jewelry can be crafted with hinges, or other moving parts, to create a unique and eye-catching piece.
  • Arts and Crafts: The Arts and Crafts movement of the late 1800s was a reaction to the mass-produced, machine-made jewelry of the Victorian era. Artists sought to create more authentic pieces that were handmade and of higher aesthetic value.
  • Assay: Assessing the purity of gold, silver, and other alloys is an important process in the jewelry industry. This process, known as assaying, involves testing the precious metals for clarity and establishing standards for their purity.
  • Asscher Cut: The Asscher cut is an octagonal diamond cut that was first introduced in 1902. It has 58 facets and is known for its timeless elegance and grace, reminiscent of the glamour of the Roaring Twenties. This cut is a classic choice for those looking for a timeless piece of jewelry.
  • Aurora Borealis: The shimmering beauty of the night sky, known as the Aurora Borealis, is a sight to behold. Its ethereal glow is a reminder of the wonders of nature, and a perfect inspiration for jewelry.

B

  • Baguette: A slender, rectangular gemstone that captures light with its radiant facets.
  • Baguette Cut: A popular choice for primary stones, this rectangular diamond cut features four corners and extended facets for a captivating look.
  • Bail: The connector at the top of a pendant, allowing it to gracefully hang from a chain or jump ring.
  • Bakelite: A versatile and affordable material used in jewelry during the 1930s. This fire-resistant plastic allowed for the creation of bracelets, rings, and pins.
  • Bandeau: A slim, decorative headpiece worn low on the forehead, often adorned with beads or gems.
  • Bangle: A rigid bracelet, typically made of metal or other hard materials, that adds a touch of elegance to any wrist.
  • Baroque: Jewelry featuring intricate designs, bold lines, and lavish details, reminiscent of the Baroque art movement.
  • Basse-taille: A technique involving glass enamel applied to a metal surface, creating a low-relief pattern with colored enamel on a gold or silver base.
  • Bearding: Small, feather-like fractures along a diamond’s circumference, impacting pricing for stones over 1.5 carats.
  • Belle Epoque: The Edwardian period in jewelry, characterized by intricate designs and delicate craftsmanship.
  • Berlin Iron: Jewelry crafted from cast iron in the early 19th century, featuring intricate openwork patterns with a delicate touch.
  • Beryl: A highly valued precious gemstone with a wide range of colors, from colorless to shades of green, blue, yellow, and pink.
  • Bezel: A type of setting that securely holds a stone in place with a collar instead of prongs, offering a sleek and modern look.
  • Bijouterie: The art of creating beautiful and unique jewelry pieces using precious metals and enamel. It requires a high level of skill and precision.
  • Birthstone: A gemstone traditionally associated with one’s birth month, often used in jewelry to commemorate special occasions or add a personal touch.
  • Biwa Pearl: A freshwater pearl cultivated in Japan, known for its unique shape and luster.
  • Black Antique: Jewelry pieces coated with a durable black finish to evoke an antique look.
  • Black Star of Queensland: The largest gem-quality star sapphire in the world, weighing 733 carats and displaying a mesmerizing star-like pattern.
  • Blemish: An imperfection on the surface of a piece of jewelry, such as a spot, scratch, or discoloration.
  • Bling: Flashy and eye-catching jewelry, often associated with wealth and status.
  • Blister Pearl: A pearl cut from an oyster shell with an irregular shape and a hollow center, resulting in a unique and eye-catching piece.
  • Blue Topaz: A popular gemstone that is usually colorless or light brown when mined but transforms to a vibrant blue when exposed to heat.
  • Bog Oak: A type of wood preserved in Irish bogs for thousands of years, prized for its hardness and unique look when used in jewelry.
  • Bolt Ring: A partially or entirely hollow jewelry finding with an internal spring, used to connect rings.
  • Book Chain: A chain crafted from gold or silver featuring rectangular links folded to resemble a book, adding a timeless Victorian touch.
  • Borax: A white, powdery substance used in jewelry making as a flux when soldering gold and silver. It helps clean, coat, and protect the metal from oxidation.
  • Box Setting: A secure setting where a precious stone is held in place by a metal box-shaped frame with edges pressed down.
  • Bracelet: A piece of jewelry worn around the wrist, available in various styles like bangles, chains, tennis bracelets, cuffs, and charm bracelets.
  • Braided: A design element featuring multiple strands of metal intertwined to create a woven look.
  • Brass: A popular jewelry metal with a warm, golden hue, composed of copper and zinc.
  • Brilliance: The sparkle and luminosity of a diamond or gemstone.
  • Brilliant Cut: The most popular diamond cut, featuring 58 facets designed to maximize sparkle and brilliance.
  • Briolette: A pear-shaped gemstone with multiple facets, offering a unique and elongated appearance.
  • Bronze: A heavy and dense alloy of copper and tin, used in various jewelry pieces.
  • Brooch: A decorative piece of jewelry secured to clothing with a pin and clasp, often larger than other types of pins and used to add a touch of personality to an outfit.
  • Brushed Finish: A popular texturing technique where a wire brush or polishing tool creates a series of tiny parallel lines on the metal surface, resulting in a matte look.
  • Buff Top Cabochon: A gemstone cut with a domed top and a faceted bottom, offering a unique and eye-catching look.
  • Bulla: An ancient Roman jewelry relic consisting of two concave

C

  • Catch: Before safety catches, brooches were secured with pins or clasps.
  • Cable: Jewelry often utilizes wire, made from precious or semi-precious metals, for intricate designs.
  • Cabochon: A dome-shaped gemstone with a flat back, polished smooth without facets.
  • CAD: Computer-assisted design helps jewelers create complex shapes and patterns with ease.
  • Calibre Cut: Perfectly faceted gemstones, arranged closely, create stunning jewelry.
  • Caliper: This instrument accurately measures the size of gemstones for setting.
  • Cameo: A type of jewelry carved from layered stone, often depicting a profile or scene.
  • Cameo Habille: A carved female figure wearing jewelry like pendants, earrings, or a crown.
  • Canary Diamond: A sparkling yellow diamond, prized for its vibrant and unique hue.
  • Cannetille: Delicate, scrolling decorations made from intricately coiled and twisted gold wire.
  • Carat: A unit of weight used to measure the size of diamonds and other gemstones, where larger stones are generally more valuable.
  • Carbide: A type of jewelry material made from carbon and another element.
  • Carbon-Fiber: A strong and lightweight material, often used for durable and stylish jewelry.
  • Carbuncle: A cabochon cut garnet, showcasing its beauty and depth.
  • Carmen Lucia Ruby: The largest faceted Ruby in the National Gem Collection, renowned for its exceptional quality and size.
  • Carnelian: A semi-translucent gemstone with a deep red to orange hue, often featuring a unique banded pattern.
  • Cartouche: A swirling or scroll-like decorative element, engraved into the metal, adding a touch of elegance.
  • Casting: A technique where molten metal is poured into a mold to create a desired shape.
  • Catalin: A durable and heat-resistant plastic, popular for creating unique costume jewelry.
  • Cathedral Setting: A sophisticated setting highlighting the center stone as the main focus.
  • Celluloid: A thin plastic, often used to create intricate molds for jewelry pieces.
  • Celtic: Jewelry featuring traditional symbols like knots, spirals, and triskeles, inspired by Celtic cultures.
  • Center Stone: The main gemstone in a piece of jewelry, usually the most valuable and eye-catching.
  • Chalcedony: A semi-precious gemstone with a greyish-blue hue, often used for its beauty and durability.
  • Champleve: A technique where recessed areas in metal are filled with enamel or molten glass, creating beautiful designs.
  • Channel: Two metal rails running along either side of gemstones, securing them in a channel setting.
  • Channel Setting: A setting where stones of the same size are arranged in a continuous line, held in place by a metal channel.
  • Charm: A decorative jewelry piece, often worn on a necklace or bracelet, associated with good luck and protection.
  • Chasing: A technique for decorating metal surfaces with shaped punches and a chasing hammer, creating intricate indentations.
  • Chatelaine: A decorative belt hook with dangling chains, worn by women for attaching various items.
  • Chaton Cut: A round crystal jewelry stone with 12 facets on the pointed back, adding sparkle.
  • Choker: A type of necklace that fits snugly around the neck, usually shorter than 14 inches.
  • Chrome: A hard, grayish-white metal, valued in jewelry for its resistance to corrosion and difficulty to fuse.
  • Chrysoberyl: A semi-precious gemstone known for its unique and beautiful colors, ranging from golden-yellow to brown.
  • Cire-perdue: A casting technique where molten metal is poured into a hollow mold created with wax, allowing for intricate designs.
  • Citrine: A type of quartz with a light yellow to vibrant orange hue, sometimes mistaken for imperial topaz.
  • Clarity: A measure of how free a gemstone is from flaws, affecting its quality and value.
  • Classic: Timeless jewelry pieces like the diamond solitaire necklace, remaining popular and elegant over time.
  • Cloisonne: A type of jewelry crafted by enameling metal with colored glass powder, creating beautiful and intricate designs.
  • Cloud: Small, white particles embedded in a diamond, affecting its clarity and caused by various factors.
  • Cluster: A collection of closely set precious or semi-precious gemstones, creating a unique and eye-catching piece.
  • Collet: A round band of metal used to secure a gemstone in place within jewelry.
  • Collier: A type of necklace that wraps around the neck, from the base of the throat to the chin, adding a touch of elegance.
  • Color: The intensity of a diamond’s color saturation, used to assess its value.
  • Color Diamond: A diamond with a hue other than white, ranging from yellow, pink, blue, and even black. These rare gems are prized for their unique beauty.
  • Comfort Fit: A ring design featuring rounded edges on the shank for maximum comfort and wearability.
  • Contemporary: A jewelry design reflecting the latest trends and modern aesthetic.
  • Contrasting Finish: A jewelry piece with different parts having different finishes for visual interest and a unique look.
  • Copper: A reddish-brown metallic element commonly used in jewelry making.
  • Coral: A beautiful material used in jewelry, formed by coral polyps and composed of Calcium Carbonate.
  • Corundum: A mineral valued for its hardness and beauty, forming gemstones like ruby and sapphire.
  • Creole Earrings: Hoop earrings wider at the bottom than the top, popular in the 1850s.
  • Crest: A decorative emblem often seen in medieval and Renaissance jewelry, signifying the wearer’s identity.
  • Criss-Cross Ring: A ring featuring multiple bands that cross over each other in a criss-cross pattern.
  • Cross: A popular jewelry design with two intersecting lines, symbolizing faith and spirituality.
  • Cross Facet: Small triangular facets above and below the girdle of a brilliant cut stone, enhancing its sparkle.
  • Crown: The upper portion of a gemstone located above the widest part.
  • Crystal: A solidified chemical element, compound, or mixture with a repeating internal atomic arrangement and often external plane faces, commonly used in jewelry.
  • Cubic Zirconium: A man-made gemstone resembling diamond in appearance but lacking its hardness.
  • Cuff Link: A set of two adorned metal pieces connected by a bar, used to secure shirt cuffs.
  • Culet: The lowermost part of a gemstone’s pavilion, sometimes polished with a small facet or left pointed.
  • Cullinan Diamond: A remarkable gemstone discovered in South Africa in 1905, weighing an impressive 3,106.75 carats and becoming a symbol of luxury and prestige.
  • Cultured Pearl: A pearl cultivated by a mussel or oyster farmer in a controlled environment, prized for its beauty and quality.
  • Cushion Cut: A square or rectangular gemstone with softened corners, offering a classic and timeless appearance.
  • Custom Jewelry: A one-of-a-kind piece designed exclusively for the wearer.
  • Custom Cut Gemstone: A professionally cut gemstone tailored to the desired shape and size, adding a unique touch to jewelry.
  • Cut: The geometric arrangement of a gemstone determines its symmetry and light reflection/refraction.
  • Cut Steel: Steel studs crafted with intricate facets and a glossy finish, adding sparkle and statement to any outfit.

D

  • Dainty: A piece marked by delicate or diminutive beauty, form, or grace. Often used to describe earrings, necklaces, and bracelets with a light and airy feel.
  • Damascene: A type of jewelry, often originating from Spain, featuring intricate metal inlay work creating decorative patterns.
  • Damascus steel: Steel with a distinctive wavy or zebra-like pattern, known for its strength and beauty. Used in some jewelry designs for a unique aesthetic.
  • Danglers: Earrings with a focal point that drops below the earlobe and swings freely. Often associated with a playful and elegant look.
  • Demi-parure: A set of matching jewelry that includes two or three pieces, such as a necklace and earrings or a bracelet and brooch.
  • Depose: The legal term used in France for the registration of a design for exclusive rights in the jewelry industry.
  • Depth: The distance from a gemstone’s table (the flat top) to its culet (the pointed bottom), measured in millimeters.
  • Depth percentage: The ratio of a gemstone’s depth to its diameter, expressed as a percentage. This ratio helps assess the stone’s proportions and brilliance.
  • Diadems: A semi-circular band worn around the head, often adorned with jewels and three-dimensional elements, symbolizing royalty and high status.
  • Diamond: A mineral composed of pure carbon, renowned for its exceptional hardness, brilliance, and value.
  • Diamond Cut: A term used in the colored gemstone trade to specifically denote the brilliant cut, which maximizes a gemstone’s brilliance and fire.
  • Dog Collar: A snug necklace, typically made of pearls or beads, worn high up on the neck. Often associated with a timeless and elegant style.
  • Domed: A gemstone shape with a rounded top resembling half of a sphere, adding a soft and smooth touch to jewelry.
  • Double Prong: A setting for gemstones where each prong has an additional prong alongside it, providing enhanced security and protection.
  • Dresden Green Diamond: A rare and valuable 41-carat natural green diamond of unknown origin, believed to have come from India.
  • Drop: An earring style with a decorative element that hangs below the earlobe, often attached by a simple chain or hoop. Offers a versatile and stylish option.
  • Duette: A type of jewelry consisting of two clips or ornaments attached to a single pin back, creating a unique and coordinated look.

E

  • Earrings: Ornaments worn in the earlobe or other pierced parts of the ear.
  • East-West: A setting for elongated stones, positioned horizontally with their longer sides parallel to the band.
  • Eco-Friendly: Jewelry made with sustainable and environmentally responsible practices.
  • Edwardian: A jewelry style characterized by delicate designs, intricate details, and platinum settings, popular during the late Victorian and early 20th century.
  • Electro-plating: A technique that uses electricity to apply a thin layer of metal (often gold) to another metal surface.
  • Elegant: Possessing a pleasing and stylish appearance, displaying refinement and grace.
  • Emerald: A precious gemstone belonging to the beryl family, known for its vibrant green color.
  • Emerald Cut: A rectangular gemstone shape with clipped corners, featuring a series of parallel step cuts that accentuate its brilliance.
  • Empire Earrings: Hoop-shaped earrings inspired by ancient Roman designs, often adorned with freshwater pearls or amethysts.
  • En Tremblant: A technique that creates a trembling effect in jewelry, often in brooches, using coiled springs to add movement and dynamism.
  • Enamel: A decorative glass coating applied to metal and fired in a kiln to produce a durable and colorful finish.
  • Engagement: The period between a proposal of marriage and the wedding ceremony.
  • Engagement Ring: A ring given to symbolize a commitment to marry.
  • Engraving: The process of creating a design on a metal surface by etching with a sharp tool.
  • Enhancer: A hinged loop that attaches a pendant or charm to a chain, allowing for easy removal and replacement.
  • Estate Jewelry: Jewelry inherited from a deceased person, often holding sentimental value.
  • Etching: The process of removing part of a metal surface with acid to create a decorative design.
  • Eternity Band: A wedding ring style featuring a continuous line of identical gemstones, symbolizing everlasting love and commitment.
  • Etui: A small cylindrical case, often hung from a chatelaine, used to store small items.
  • Euro-shank: A ring shank with a flat or square bottom, offering increased comfort and stability.
  • European Cut: An older diamond cutting style with a smaller table and larger culet compared to modern cuts.
  • Extinction: Dark or black spots appearing within colored gemstones, impacting their clarity and value.
  • Eye-Clean: A term used for gemstones with no visible flaws under 10x magnification.

F

  • Facet: A smooth, polished surface on a gemstone that helps reflect and refract light, creating its brilliance and sparkle. Jewelry makers use various types of facets, including crown, pavilion, table, and culet, to achieve the desired effect.
  • Faience: A type of glazed ceramic material often used in jewelry making, known for its unique and beautiful finish, often decorated with intricate designs.
  • Fancy Cut: A term used for diamond cuts other than the traditional round brilliant cut, including princess, emerald, cushion, marquise, oval, and heart shapes. Each offers its own unique characteristics and enhances the diamond’s beauty.
  • Fashion Ring: Jewelry worn for its aesthetic appeal rather than any specific meaning or symbolism.
  • Faux: Imitation jewelry made to resemble real jewelry but using less valuable materials.
  • Feather: An internal imperfection with a feathery texture found in some gemstones.
  • Fede Ring: A ring featuring two clasped hands, symbolizing unity and friendship.
  • Ferronniere: A narrow band of jewelry with a central gemstone worn around the forehead.
  • Festoon: A jewelry design featuring a pattern of intertwined flowers, leaves, and ribbons, creating a garland-like look.
  • Fibula: An ancient type of brooch made from metal, used to secure clothing.
  • Filigree: Intricate designs created with fine wire, resembling rosettes, spirals, scrolls, and vines, adding a delicate touch to jewelry.
  • Findings: Components used in jewelry making, such as clasps, pins, hooks, tabs, and more, essential for assembling pieces.
  • Finish: Refers to the surface texture of jewelry, such as polished, brushed, hammered, or sandblasted.
  • Fire: The dispersion of light into different colors when it passes through a diamond or gemstone, creating its brilliance and rainbow effect.
  • Flat Band: A ring band with straight edges and a flat top, rather than a curved or domed shape.
  • Flaw: Any internal or external imperfection in a gemstone, such as inclusions, fractures, or blemishes, that can affect its appearance and value.
  • Flawless: A gemstone free of any visible flaws under 10x magnification, considered highly valuable for its exceptional quality.
  • Fleur-de-lis: A stylized three-petaled iris flower, a timeless symbol of elegance and sophistication often featured in jewelry designs.
  • Floral: Jewelry featuring flower, leaf, vine, or other plant-like designs.
  • Florentine: A term for jewelry inspired by the city of Florence, Italy, characterized by intricate designs and ornate details.
  • Florentine Finish: A decorative criss-cross pattern etched into the surface of a metal jewelry piece.
  • Fluorescence: The luminescent glow emitted by certain diamonds when exposed to ultraviolet light.
  • Flush Setting: A jewelry setting where a gemstone is placed within a metal hole and covered over the girdle with metal, creating a smooth, even surface.
  • Flux: A material used in jewelry making to aid in soldering two pieces of metal together. Flux helps prevent oxidation and corrosion, creating a strong and lasting bond.
  • Fob: A decorative chain or ribbon attached to a pocket watch, often adorned with a charm or seal.
  • Foil: A reflective coating applied to the back of a gemstone or rhinestone to enhance its brilliance and color intensity, creating a more dazzling effect.
  • Fracture: A crack, feather, or chip within a gemstone that can impact its value and durability.
  • French Cut: A gemstone cut featuring a square or rectangular shape with multiple facets, known for its unique sparkle and shine.
  • French Ivory: A synthetic material resembling genuine ivory, popular in jewelry making due to its similar look and feel without ethical concerns.
  • French Jet: A type of glass resembling real jet, used in jewelry for its dark, glossy finish and sophisticated appearance.
  • French Wire: A curved wire with a fish hook closure, worn through the pierced earlobe and popular for securing earrings.
  • Freshwater Pearls: Natural pearls formed in freshwater mollusks, known for their unique beauty, variety in color and shape, and rarity.
  • Full Lead Crystal: A type of high-quality glassware containing a high lead oxide content, prized for its exceptional brilliance, clarity, and color spectrum.
  • Full-Cut Brilliant: A diamond or colored stone cut with a total of 58 facets, 32 above the girdle and 24 below, resulting in a dazzling brilliance and sparkle.

G

  • Garnet: A family of gemstones with diverse colors and compositions, including the popular red variety.
  • Gemologist: A trained professional specializing in identifying, grading, and appraising gemstones.
  • Gemology: The scientific study of gemstones, encompassing identification, classification, and analysis of their properties.
  • Gemstone Certificate: An official document issued by a reputable gemological laboratory, verifying the specifications and value of a gemstone.
  • Gemstones: A general term encompassing diamonds, sapphires, emeralds, and many other valuable minerals used in jewelry.
  • Gerlots: Small, elongated pendant beads often used for decorative purposes.
  • GIA: Acronym for the Gemological Institute of America, a leading authority in gemological education and research.
  • Gilding: The process of applying a thin layer of gold to an object, enhancing its appearance and value.
  • Gilt: Resembling or having the luxurious qualities of gold.
  • Gimmel Ring: A ring composed of two or more linked hoops, designed to appear as one when worn.
  • Girandole: A jewelry design featuring three pear-shaped stones or pearls suspended from a larger stone or decorative motif.
  • Girdle: The outer edge of a gemstone, where the crown and pavilion meet, typically the part held by the setting.
  • Gold: A valuable, naturally occurring yellow metal used extensively in jewelry for its beauty, malleability, and resistance to tarnishing.
  • Gold Washed: A jewelry piece with a very thin layer of gold applied by dipping or burnishing, not considered plated.
  • Gold-Filled: A jewelry piece composed of a base metal covered in a thick layer of gold (at least 10k and 1/20th of the total weight).
  • Gold-Plated: A jewelry piece made of a base metal with a thin layer of gold (less than 1/20th of the total weight) bonded to its surface.
  • Golden Jubilee Diamond: The world’s largest cut and faceted diamond, weighing 545.67 carats and discovered in 1985.
  • Grading: The process of evaluating and assigning a score to diamonds and gemstones based on their quality and value, typically done by experienced gemologists.
  • Granulation: A decorative technique involving applying tiny grains of metal to a metal surface.
  • Graver Tool: A chisel-like tool used for engraving designs and patterns onto metal.
  • Green Gold: Gold with a high silver content, resulting in a greenish hue.
  • Grey Gold: Gold with a high iron content, giving it a greyish appearance.
  • Grill: A removable piece of jewelry worn over the teeth, often made of precious metal and adorned with gemstones.
  • Grisaille: A type of enamel work featuring monochromatic painting.
  • Guilloche Enamel: A decorative technique where metal is patterned using an engine-turned lathe before applying enamel.
  • Gypsy Setting: A setting style where a gemstone is sunk into the surrounding metal, leaving its top nearly flush with the surface.

H

  • Half Moon Cut: A gemstone shaped like a semi-oval, resembling a circle cut in half.
  • Hallmark: A stamped mark on jewelry, used in many countries, to verify the purity of the precious metal after testing.
  • Halo: A setting design featuring a ring of diamonds or gemstones surrounding a central gemstone, enhancing its brilliance and creating a dramatic effect.
  • Hammered Finish: A jewelry finish achieved by hammering the metal piece to create tiny, textured planes, often polished for a unique aesthetic.
  • Hand Engraving: A traditional technique where designs are meticulously etched onto a jewelry piece using hand-held tools like gravers, spitzers, and scrappers, offering an artisanal and personalized touch.
  • Hardness: A measure of a material’s resistance to scratches and abrasions, crucial for understanding a gemstone’s durability.
  • Head: The part of a jewelry piece that holds and secures the gemstone.
  • Heart Cut: A diamond cut shaped like a heart, featuring two rounded lobes at the top and a pointed bottom, symbolizing love and affection.
  • Heirloom: A piece of jewelry passed down through generations, holding sentimental value and representing family history.
  • Hematite: A naturally occurring iron oxide mineral, sometimes used in jewelry for its distinctive metallic luster and black or reddish-brown color.
  • Hoop: A circular earring design resembling a ring that passes through the earlobe, offering a classic and versatile option.
  • Hope Diamond: A renowned 45.52 carat blue diamond currently on display at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., known for its exceptional size and historical significance.
  • Horn: A natural material, often used as a substitute for tortoiseshell due to its similar appearance and texture, particularly in vintage jewelry.

I

  • Ideal²: A square diamond cut with a distinctive “hearts and arrows” pattern, known for its exceptional brilliance and unique visual effect, ideal for special occasions.
  • IGI: International Gemological Institute, a global leader in gemstone identification and grading, providing expert services to the jewelry industry.
  • Igneous: Jewelry crafted from a rock formed by the solidification of molten magma or lava, offering a unique and natural aesthetic.
  • Imperfection: Any characteristic of a jewelry piece that detracts from its appearance, including inclusions, fractures, discoloration, or blemishes.
  • Inclusion: Internal imperfections within a gemstone, such as fractures, crystals, or foreign materials, impacting its clarity and value.
  • Ingot: A bar or brick of precious metal, like gold or silver, formed by melting and pouring the molten metal into a mold.
  • Initials: Personalizing jewelry with the initials of a loved one, typically their first and last name, creating a meaningful and sentimental touch.
  • Inlaid: A jewelry piece decorated by setting another material, often gemstones or decorative elements, into prepared channels or voids within the metal.
  • Inlay: A technique where a material, like stone, mother-of-pearl, or another contrasting element, is embedded into the jewelry surface, creating a flush and integrated design.
  • Intaglio: A jewelry design featuring a carved design into a gemstone, often used for seals or authentication purposes.
  • Interlocking: A wedding set consisting of multiple pieces designed to fit securely together, ensuring each piece remains in place and creating a unified look.
  • Intertwined: Multiple necklaces or other jewelry items designed to interlace with each other, offering a unique and layered look.
  • Invisible Setting: A setting style where princess cut diamonds or other gemstones are positioned tightly together, with no visible metal separating them, and framed by a thin metal border, creating a seamless and elegant effect.
  • Iridescent: Jewelry exhibiting a dazzling display of shimmering colors, similar to a rainbow.
  • Iridium: A precious metal belonging to the platinum family, often used in combination with platinum to enhance its workability in jewelry crafting.
  • Irradiation: A process used to improve the color of gemstones or pearls, where they are exposed to radiation, resulting in intensified and vibrant hues. Irradiation can also create unique color combinations.
  • Ivory: A hard, smooth, yellowish-white material derived from the tusks of elephants and walruses, historically used in jewelry making, but often replaced with ethically sourced alternatives today.

J

  • Jabot Pin: A decorative tie pin adorned with jewels, popular in the 1920s and 1930s, used to secure a jabot (a decorative frill or ruffle) on a shirt.
  • Jade: A beautiful, semi-precious gemstone prized for its unique green color, but also available in lavender and rose hues. Its durability and beauty make it popular in jewelry.
  • Jadeite: A rare and highly sought-after variety of jade with exceptional translucence and glass-like appearance. Its hardness makes it a desirable choice for jewelry crafting.
  • Jasper: A semi-translucent gemstone known for its diverse colors like red, yellow, and brown. Its unique polycrystalline structure creates a beautiful and distinctive look, making it popular in jewelry design.
  • Jet: A type of fossilized coal, polished to a high gloss, traditionally used in mourning jewelry, toys, buttons, and inlays. Its dark color and glossy finish make it a popular choice for jewelry creation.
  • Jewelers of America: A trade association dedicated to maintaining high ethical standards within the jewelry industry, promoting consumer confidence and fair business practices.
  • Jump Ring: A small, circular or oval-shaped wire loop used to attach charms and pendants to necklaces, bracelets, and other jewelry pieces, allowing for easy addition and removal.

K

  • Karat: A unit of measurement used to indicate the purity of gold in an alloy. 24 karats is pure gold, while 18 karats signifies 75% gold and 25% other metals, 14 karats means 58.3% gold and 41.7% other metals, and so on.
  • Knife Edge: A ring style featuring a shank that forms a point at the middle, creating a sharp and angular look compared to traditional rounded or flat bands.
  • Knot: A design element in jewelry featuring multiple curved, wavy metal pieces that are loosely interlaced and soldered together. This creates a decorative and textured effect, often used in rings, bracelets, and necklaces.

L

  • Lab Diamond: A diamond created in a laboratory setting, mimicking the physical and chemical properties of a natural diamond, but produced through controlled processes. Lab-created diamonds offer affordability and ethical production.
  • Lab Gemstone: A gemstone crafted in a laboratory environment, replicating the natural gemstone’s characteristics but offering a more cost-effective and sustainable alternative.
  • Lapidary: The art of cutting, shaping, polishing, and creating beautiful jewelry pieces from gemstones.
  • Laser Drilling: A technique used to improve gemstone clarity by introducing bleaching or other enhancing agents, leading to a more attractive and desirable stone.
  • Laser Engraving: The process of using a laser beam to create intricate designs on jewelry pieces, offering a unique and personalized touch.
  • Lavaliere: A necklace featuring a pendant or gemstone suspended from a chain, often associated with elegance and femininity.
  • Leakage: Unintentional light transmission through a gemstone’s cut surfaces, causing a loss of brilliance and sparkle.
  • Lever Back: A popular earring back design featuring a clasp for secure closure, ensuring a comfortable and reliable fit.
  • Liquid Silver: Silver beads, often referred to as liquid silver, are created by slicing sterling silver tubes into small pieces and stringing them together, creating a shimmering and versatile jewelry material.
  • Living Jewelry: Jewelry crafted from materials derived from living organisms, such as shells, coral, pearls, wood, seeds, and leaves, adding a touch of nature to your wardrobe.
  • Locket: A jewelry piece, typically shaped like an oval or heart, with a hinged closure for holding a photograph or keepsake, offering a sentimental and personal touch.
  • Logan Sapphire: A stunning 422.99 carat sapphire discovered in Sri Lanka, known for its deep, rich blue hue and unmatched beauty.
  • London Blue Topaz: A gemstone prized for its intense, dark blue-green color, offering a popular and vibrant choice for jewelry design.
  • Lost Wax Process or Casting: A popular jewelry casting method where a wax model is created, encased in an investment material, and then replaced with molten metal after the wax is melted away, allowing for intricate details and delicate designs.
  • Loupe: A handheld magnifying glass, small enough to fit in the eye socket, used for inspecting gemstones and analyzing their details.
  • Low-Profile: A ring design featuring a center stone set close to the band, creating a subtle and elegant look with the stone sitting close to the finger.
  • Lucite: A versatile, clear, transparent plastic used to create jewelry pieces, offering a unique material for molding and carving into various shapes and sizes.
  • Luster: The shine and brilliance of a jewelry piece, determined by the amount and quality of light reflected off its surface.
  • Luxury: A lavish and high-quality piece of jewelry, often adorned with precious materials and intricate designs, intended to make a statement and exude opulence.

M

  • Mabe: A Japanese term for cultured pearls grown against the shell, resulting in a half-sphere shape.
  • Maltese Cross: A design featuring four broad arms of equal length, sometimes with V-shaped notches at the ends, associated with the Order of Saint John.
  • Marcasite: An iron ore (pyrite) faceted into rose cuts and often set in silver or pewter jewelry, offering a sparkling and affordable alternative to diamonds.
  • Marquis Cut: An elongated, oval-shaped gemstone with pointed ends, adding elegance and sophistication to jewelry.
  • Master Stones: A set of diamonds used as the definitive reference for grading the color of other diamonds, ensuring consistency and accuracy in the grading process.
  • Matching: Jewelry pieces that share similar elements in style, color, or design, creating a cohesive and coordinated look.
  • Matte: A non-reflective finish achieved through chemical processes or abrasive materials, adding a subtle and textured element to jewelry pieces.
  • Melange: A term for a mixture of diamond sizes, exceeding a total weight of 1 carat, offering a diverse and unique sparkle.
  • Melee: A classification for diamonds weighing less than 1 carat, often used in smaller accent settings or intricate designs.
  • Memento Mori: Jewelry crafted as a reminder of mortality, often featuring motifs like skulls or skeletons, serving as a contemplative and philosophical statement.
  • Memorial Jewel: A piece of jewelry created in memory of a loved one, often containing the deceased’s hair or other personal mementos, and frequently adorned with enamel for a personalized touch.
  • Metamorphic: Rocks transformed by pressure, heat, and water, resulting in a denser and more crystalline composition, often used in jewelry for their unique textures and patterns.
  • Meteorite: A small celestial object that reaches Earth’s surface without being completely vaporized, offering a rare and fascinating material for jewelry creation.
  • Micro Mosaic: A decorative technique using tiny, colored glass pieces (tesserae) inlaid in glass or hardstone, creating intricate and detailed mosaics in jewelry design.
  • Micro-Pavé: A setting style featuring tiny gemstones set very close together, typically in rows of three or more, creating a shimmering and luxurious appearance.
  • Milanese Chain: A type of chain consisting of interwoven rows of small links, forming a mesh-like structure and offering a flexible and comfortable wear.
  • Milgrain: Tiny metal beads applied decoratively to jewelry pieces, adding a delicate and vintage aesthetic, often used in borders or around gemstones.
  • Millefiori: A method for creating glass or clay beads with intricate patterns, achieved by using pre-formed canes with embedded colored glass or clay pieces.
  • Minaudiere: A woman’s small, hard vanity case or handbag, often made of metal or wood, held in the hand for carrying personal items.
  • Mine Cut: An antique diamond cut with a chunky appearance, featuring a cushion or round shape.
  • Minimalist: A jewelry design characterized by simplicity and sparseness, often featuring clean lines and geometric shapes.
  • Mississippi River Pearls: Irregularly shaped pearls, typically elongated and with unique baroque forms.
  • Mizpah Ring: A broad gold ring engraved with the word “MIZPAH,” a Hebrew word meaning “watchtower,” symbolizing protection and divine watchfulness.
  • Mohs Hardness Scale: A qualitative scale measuring the scratch resistance of minerals, with harder materials able to scratch softer ones.
  • Moissanite: A naturally occurring silicon carbide mineral found in meteorites, often used as a diamond simulant due to its brilliance and durability.
  • Mokumé Gane: A Japanese metalworking technique that produces a mixed-metal design resembling wood grain, creating a unique and textured aesthetic.
  • Money Clip: A compact device used to store cash and credit cards securely and conveniently.
  • Montana Sapphire: A blue sapphire primarily mined in the Yogo Gulch of Montana, known for its intense color and clarity.
  • Moonstone: A transparent, feldspar gemstone with a milky white color and opalescent spots, offering an ethereal and shimmering appearance.
  • Morganite: A rose-colored variety of beryl, prized for its delicate and feminine hue.
  • Mosaic: A design created by arranging small pieces of stone, glass, or ceramic tiles called tesserae into a decorative pattern.
  • Mother-of-pearl: The iridescent material found inside the shells of mollusks like oysters and mussels, often used in jewelry for its pearly luster and beauty.
  • Mount: The act of placing or fixing a gemstone securely in its setting.
  • Mounting: The metal piece that holds a gemstone in place, often featuring prongs, bezels, or other secure settings.
  • Mourning Jewelry: Jewelry worn to commemorate the death of a loved one, typically featuring black stones, engraved initials, or other symbolic elements.
  • Moval: A diamond cut combining the tapered edges of a marquise cut with the rounded points of an oval cut, offering a unique and elongated shape.
  • Multi-Band: A ring composed of more than one band, often featuring contrasting colors, textures, or stones, for a layered and bold look.

N

  • Nacre: The iridescent material produced by mollusks, such as oysters and mussels, that forms the outer layer of a pearl. It is responsible for the pearl’s luster and characteristic color.
  • Natural Diamond: A diamond that formed naturally within the Earth’s crust over millions of years, without any human intervention. Natural diamonds are valued for their rarity and unique qualities.
  • Navette: A ring design featuring a large, marquise-shaped center stone surrounded by a halo of smaller diamonds or other gemstones, creating a radiant and eye-catching look.
  • Necklace: A piece of jewelry worn around the neck, typically consisting of a chain or string with beads, pendants, or other decorative elements. Necklaces come in various styles and lengths to suit different tastes and occasions.
  • Negligee: A necklace featuring a long chain with an uneven hemline, often adorned with dangling tassels or drops. It offers a graceful and flowing design, reminiscent of a negligee gown.
  • Nickel Silver: A white metal alloy consisting of copper, zinc, and nickel, but without any silver content. It is a popular choice for jewelry making due to its affordability, durability, and resemblance to silver.
  • Niello: An inlay technique used in jewelry making where grooves are carved into silver or gold and then filled with a black metal sulfide mixture, creating intricate black patterns and designs. This technique adds a decorative and contrasting element to jewelry pieces.

O

  • Oiling: A temporary treatment used to improve the clarity and color of certain gemstones by filling in small fractures with a colorless oil.
  • Old Euro Cut: A round antique diamond cut characterized by chunky facets and a small table, resulting in a distinctive vintage aesthetic.
  • Old Mine Cut: An antique diamond cut featuring a cushion or round shape and a chunky look, known for its historical significance and vintage charm.
  • Onyx: A semi-precious gemstone with black or white color, often used in jewelry for its dramatic contrast and versatility.
  • Opal: A semi-precious gemstone prized for its shimmering, iridescent play of color, originating from microscopic silica spheres within the stone.
  • Opalescent: Describing a surface that exhibits a rainbow-like array of luminous colors, similar to an oil slick or mother-of-pearl, adding a unique and ethereal quality to the material.
  • Opaque: A gemstone that does not allow light to pass through, often exhibiting a solid and uniform color.
  • Open Back Setting: A gemstone setting where the back of the stone is visible, allowing light to pass through and enhance its brilliance and color.
  • Oppenheimer Diamond: A renowned 253.7 carat yellow diamond discovered in South Africa in 1964, known for its exceptional size and rarity.
  • Ore: A mineral deposit containing a valuable metal that can be economically extracted and refined.
  • Organic: A broad term applied to jewelry made from natural materials derived from living organisms (such as pearls), featuring floral or plant-like designs, or crafted with eco-friendly practices.
  • Orient: The characteristic sheen and luster of high-quality natural and cultured pearls, contributing to their beauty and value.
  • Oriental Pearl: A natural pearl formed without human intervention, known for its unique characteristics and rarity.
  • Oval Cut: An elongated gemstone with a rounded oval shape at both ends, offering a classic and versatile look.
  • Oxidation: A chemical reaction where metals like silver react with sulfur and oxygen, causing them to darken or tarnish, creating a vintage or antiqued aesthetic.
  • Oxide: A compound formed by the combination of one oxygen atom with another element.
  • Oxidize: The process by which a metal combines with oxygen molecules to form an oxide, leading to a change in color or surface texture.
  • Oxygen: A non-metallic element that exists as a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas in its natural state.

P

  • Padparadscha Sapphire: A rare and valuable sapphire variety exhibiting a unique peach color, highly prized for its beauty and rarity.
  • Paillons: Tiny pieces of metallic foil placed beneath enamel work to add a luminous effect, popular among Arts and Crafts movement jewelers.
  • Palladium: A precious metal with a charcoal-gray color, related to platinum and found in Russia, South Africa, and North America.
  • Pampilles: Cascading pendant stones resembling raindrops, popular in Georgian jewelry and adding a delicate and fluid movement.
  • Parure: A set of matching jewelry, typically consisting of four or more pieces like a necklace, bracelet, earrings, and a belt or brooch, offering a coordinated and elegant look.
  • Passamenterie: Jewelry designs inspired by decorative trimmings used on furniture, offering a unique and intricate aesthetic.
  • Paste: A glass-based material used to create imitations of gemstones, offering a more affordable alternative.
  • Patina: The natural discoloration that forms on metals like silver and bronze, often desired for its vintage look and can be artificially created using chemicals.
  • Pattern: A repeated decorative design element used in jewelry, adding visual interest and complexity.
  • Pave: A setting style featuring a large field of small gemstones set very close together, creating a dazzling and luxurious surface.
  • Pavilion: The lower portion of a gemstone located below the girdle, responsible for reflecting light and contributing to its brilliance.
  • Pear Cut: A gemstone cut with a rounded, teardrop shape that tapers to a point at one end, offering a classic and elegant look.
  • Pearl: An organic gem formed within oysters and other mollusks, valued for its luster, beauty, and rarity. Perfectly round and lustrous pearls are particularly sought after.
  • Peek-a-boo Diamond: A hidden diamond set in a way that it is only visible from a specific angle, adding a touch of intrigue and surprise.
  • Pendaloque: A pear or teardrop-shaped gemstone, faceted as a brilliant cut and suspended from a smaller stone, often separated by a bow or other motif.
  • Pendant: A hanging ornament worn on a necklace, often featuring a decorative design or gemstone.
  • Peridot: A transparent variety of olivine with a yellow-green color, prized for its vibrancy and rarity.
  • Petite: A small and delicate piece of jewelry, often featuring fine details and intricate craftsmanship.
  • Pewter: A metal alloy with at least 90% tin content, used in jewelry for its affordability and versatility.
  • Pietra Dura: A mosaic technique featuring semi-precious stones arranged in a floral pattern on a black marble or onyx base, creating a stunning and intricate design.
  • Pinchbeck: A gold simulant invented in the 1720s, composed of copper and zinc, offering an affordable alternative to gold.
  • Pique: A decorative technique where tortoiseshell or horn is inlaid with mother-of-pearl, silver, or gold for an added layer of detail and visual interest.
  • Pit: An indentation on the surface of a diamond or gemstone, impacting its clarity and appearance.
  • Planishing: A hammering process used to smooth the surface of metal and create a polished finish.
  • Platinum: The most precious and valuable white metal, prized for its durability, luster, and resistance to tarnish.
  • Plique-a-jour: An enamel technique where the enamel compartments are not backed by metal, creating a translucent and stained-glass-like effect.
  • Plot: A diagram representing the distribution of clarity characteristics within a gemstone, aiding in understanding its overall clarity.
  • Point: One-hundredth (0.01) of a carat, used as a unit for measuring the weight of gemstones.
  • Polished: A smooth and glossy finish applied to jewelry pieces using various polishing techniques.
  • Pomander: A container for scented objects worn as a pendant, offering a decorative and functional accessory.
  • Popigai Crater: A large crater in Siberia, Russia, home to the world’s largest known diamond deposit.
  • Poseidon: The Greek god of the sea, often associated with water-related jewelry motifs.
  • Posy Ring: A ring engraved with a verse, typically containing a sentimental message or inscription.
  • Pot Metal: A general term for metal alloys that do not include gold, silver, or platinum as main components.
  • Precious Gemstone: A valuable and rare gemstone with exceptional beauty and durability, such as diamond, ruby, emerald, and sapphire.
  • Precious Metal: A valuable metal with desirable properties like color, malleability, and rarity, including gold, platinum, silver, and palladium.
  • Princess Cut: A square-shaped gemstone cut with a high number of facets, similar to a brilliant cut but adapted to maximize brilliance in a square shape.
  • Prong Setting: Tiny wires secure the gemstone, bending over its edges.
  • Proportion: A mathematical measure of symmetry in a gemstone.
  • Proposal: An offer of marriage.

Q

  • Quartz: A naturally occurring gemstone formed from silicon dioxide crystals, prized for its durability and diverse colors and shapes, making it a popular choice in jewelry design.

R

  • Radiant Cut: A unique gemstone combining the rectangular shape of an emerald cut with the brilliance of a brilliant cut, creating a stunning and eye-catching piece.
  • Rails: Precious metal edges lining a melee setting, adding beauty and design detail.
  • Refinishing: The process of restoring a piece of jewelry to its original finish.
  • Refraction: The bending of light as it passes through a gemstone, affecting its appearance.
  • Regard: Jewelry featuring gemstones whose initials form a word, adding a personalized touch.
  • Relief: Jewelry featuring a raised design that stands out from the surface, like a cameo.
  • Repousse: A raised design created by hammering, embossing, or punching metal from the backside.
  • Restoration: Restoring an older piece of jewelry to its original condition and strength.
  • Rhinestone: Jewelry made from cut glass designed to simulate diamonds or other gemstones.
  • Rhodium: A precious metal from the platinum family, used in jewelry for its silvery shine and durability.
  • Rhodolite: A beautiful gemstone with a pink or purple hue, belonging to the garnet family.
  • Ring: A circular band of precious or semi-precious metal worn on the finger as jewelry.
  • Ring Sizes: Measurements used to indicate the size of a ring, ensuring a comfortable fit.
  • Riveting: A technique for joining two pieces of jewelry by passing a metal screw through holes in each piece.
  • Rivière: A choker-style necklace featuring a continuous line of gemstones, typically of equal or graduated sizes.
  • Rock Crystal: Transparent and sparkling quartz, also known as rock quartz, often used in jewelry.
  • Rolled Gold: A type of jewelry plating where a layer of gold is applied to a less expensive metal, offering a luxurious look at an affordable price.
  • Rondelle: A pierced piece of metal or gemstone used as a spacer between beads in a necklace, adding visual interest.
  • Rosary: A necklace made of beads used for counting prayers, typically associated with religious practices.
  • Rose Cut: A gemstone cut with a flat, multi-faceted base and a dome-shaped top adorned with triangular facets and ending in a point, offering a unique and vintage aesthetic.
  • Rose Finish: A jewelry finish that simulates the look of rose gold without actually containing any gold, providing a rosy hue at a more affordable price.
  • Rose Gold: An alloy of gold and copper, known for its soft reddish hue and popular in jewelry design for its romantic and feminine appeal.
  • Rose Quartz: A translucent gemstone with a milky-pink color, belonging to the quartz family and often used in jewelry for its gentle and romantic appearance.
  • Rosser Reeves Ruby: A renowned ruby weighing 138.7 carats, celebrated for its stunning red color and distinct star pattern.
  • Round Cut: The most common diamond and gemstone cut, characterized by its symmetrical shape and ability to maximize the stone’s brilliance.
  • Rubellite: A beautiful gemstone belonging to the tourmaline family, featuring a deep red or pink color and valued for its vibrancy and sparkle.
  • Ruby: A precious gemstone from the corundum family, prized for its distinctive red color caused by the presence of chromium oxide.
  • Rutilated Quartz: A type of quartz containing rutile inclusions, offering a unique and shimmering appearance with golden or silver highlights. Popular in jewelry for its captivating look.

S

  • Safety Catch: A secure closure mechanism for brooches, featuring a swivel that locks the pin stem into a C-shaped catch.
  • Salt-and-Pepper Diamond: A diamond with numerous inclusions creating a distinctive black-and-white pattern, valued for its unique beauty.
  • Sand Casting: A casting method where tempered sand is used to create a mold for pouring molten metal, resulting in rough castings that need further finishing.
  • Sandblasted: A jewelry piece deliberately roughened by sandblasting, resulting in a textured and unpolished finish.
  • Sapphire: A precious gemstone belonging to the corundum family, known for its vibrant blue color but also found in various colors like white, orange, green, pink, and purple.
  • Sardonyx: A variety of onyx featuring alternating layers of white and reddish-brown chalcedony, offering a distinctive striped pattern.
  • Satin Finish: A finish characterized by tiny parallel lines scratched onto the surface, creating a smooth yet textured look.
  • Sautoir: An extremely long necklace exceeding waist length, often terminating with a tassel or pendant.
  • Scarab: A beetle revered in ancient Egypt as a symbol of rebirth and rejuvenation, frequently used in jewelry design.
  • Scatter Pin: A small decorative pin, typically featuring floral or animal motifs, intended to be worn in a cluster with other scatter pins.
  • Scepter: A symbolic representation of spiritual and worldly authority, often incorporated into royal insignia.
  • Screw: A type of earring back for non-pierced ears, featuring a screw mechanism that secures the earring against the earlobe.
  • Seal: An engraved design (intaglio) carved into stone or metal, used to create an impression on wax or clay for authentication purposes.
  • Sedimentary: A rock formed from the accumulation and consolidation of sediments over time.
  • Seed Bead: Tiny, mass-produced glass or plastic beads created by slicing tubes into evenly spaced pieces, often used for intricate beadwork.
  • Seed Pearl: A very small pearl, popular during the Victorian era, used as accents in gold jewelry or woven into long necklaces.
  • Semi-Precious Gemstone: A stone valued for its beauty but considered less rare and expensive than precious gemstones.
  • Semi-Precious Stones: Another term for Semi-Precious Gemstone.
  • Setting: The mechanism or structure used to securely hold a gemstone within a piece of jewelry.
  • Sevigne: A bodice ornament featuring a bowknot design adorned with gemstones.
  • Shagreen: The dyed skin of a ray or shark, often used in jewelry for its unique texture and appearance.
  • Shamrock: A three-leafed clover, a national symbol of Ireland, often featured in Celtic jewelry designs.
  • Shank: The portion of a ring that encircles the finger, excluding the setting.
  • Shared Prong: A prong setting where a single prong holds two gemstones, one on each side.
  • Shield: A piece of defensive armor, sometimes elongated and decorated with designs, used as a motif in jewelry.
  • Shoulder: The part of a ring connecting the shank to the center of the setting.
  • Signet: A private seal engraved into a ring, typically used to impress a wax seal on documents for authentication.
  • Silver Tone: A term denoting jewelry that is silver plated or coated, but not solid sterling silver.
  • Simulated Stones: Natural or synthetic materials designed to imitate authentic gemstones at a lower cost, often with different chemical compositions.
  • Single-cut Diamonds: Genuine diamonds with only one facet, commonly used in watch cases.
  • Slide: A decorative fastener with a sliding mechanism, typically used on chains or fabric ribbons.
  • Smoky Quartz: A variety of quartz exhibiting a range of colors from cloudy brown to a dark, smoky brown.
  • Smoky Topaz: See Smoky Quartz.
  • Snake Chain: A flexible chain composed of round, wavy metal rings connected side-by-side, resembling snake skin in its texture.
  • Solder: An alloy used to join two pieces of metal in jewelry making.
  • Soldering: The process of joining two pieces of metal using a lower-melting-point metal alloy.
  • Solid Diamond: A term potentially used for marketing purposes, likely referring to a lab-created diamond that is not hollow.
  • Solitaire: A ring featuring a single diamond or gemstone as the centerpiece.
  • Sparkle: The act of reflecting or emitting bright, moving points of light.
  • Spinel: A semi-precious gemstone composed of magnesium and aluminum oxide, exhibiting a wide range of colors from colorless to ruby red to black.
  • Split Prong: A prong setting where each prong is split in two, with each half holding a separate gemstone.
  • Split Ring: A small, base-metal finding resembling a key ring, used for various jewelry components.
  • Split Shank: A ring design where the band separates into two parts as it approaches the head.
  • Spring Ring: A common type of clasp used to connect two ends of a necklace, featuring a spring mechanism for secure closure.
  • Square Band: A ring band with straight edges, not rounded like a traditional band.
  • Square Cut: A gemstone cut resembling an emerald cut, with a square shape and step facets.
  • Stabilized Turquoise: Turquoise treated to reduce its porosity, making it more durable and less prone to color change.
  • Stackable Rings: A set of rings, often with contrasting styles, designed to be worn together on top of each other.
  • Stainless Steel: A steel alloy containing chromium and sometimes other elements like nickel or molybdenum, known for its strength and resistance to corrosion.
  • Stamping: A technique for marking metal with a design or inscription using a punch or die.
  • Star 129: A round diamond cut with 129 facets, known for its exceptional brilliance and fire.
  • Step Cut: A type of gemstone cut characterized by long, rectangular facets, commonly found in emerald cuts, Asscher cuts, and baguette cuts.
  • Sterling Silver: A silver alloy containing at least 92.5% pure silver, considered the standard for silver jewelry.
  • Stomacher: A large, typically triangular, decorative ornament worn on the bodice, filling the space between the neckline and the waistline.
  • Strap Necklace: A mesh chain necklace with pendants suspended by short, fine chains, resembling a fringe.
  • Strapwork: A decorative motif featuring interlaced and crossed straight bands, resembling straps.
  • Stud: A minimalist earring style featuring a focal point attached to a post that pierces the earlobe and connects to a removable back for secure wear.
  • Super Fit Ring: A ring featuring an opening and closing mechanism, similar to a bracelet or watch band, allowing it to easily slip onto the finger before being secured.
  • Swag: A decorative motif used in jewelry, depicting festoons of foliage, fruit, and flowers.
  • Symmetry: Refers to the uniformity of a gemstone’s cut, including the shape, size, and placement of its facets. A well-cut gemstone will exhibit high symmetry for optimal light reflection and brilliance.
  • Synthetic Gemstones: Gemstones produced in a laboratory environment rather than mined from the earth. They possess identical chemical and physical properties as their natural counterparts, but are often more affordable.

T

  • Table: The large, flat facet on the top of a faceted gemstone, also known as the crown facet.
  • Table Percentage: The ratio of a gemstone’s diameter to the size of its table facet, often used to assess the gemstone’s proportions.
  • Table-cut: Another term for a “step cut,” a gemstone cut with long, rectangular facets.
  • Tahitian Pearl: A pearl with a dark gray or black color cultured in black-lipped oysters, primarily found in French Polynesia.
  • Tanzanite: A blue-violet to violet-blue gemstone known for its brilliance and varying shades, ranging from deep, rich purple to lilac.
  • Tapered: Gradually narrowing towards one end.
  • Tapered Baguette: A small, trapezoid-shaped gemstone with one narrower end.
  • Tarnish: A dull, discolored film that forms on the surface of metals due to oxidation and other environmental factors.
  • Tennis Bracelet: A flexible bracelet featuring a line of uniform, individually set gemstones linked like a chain.
  • Tension Setting: A setting where the gemstone is held in place by pressure from the surrounding metal, rather than prongs or a bezel.
  • Terminal: The decorated ends of a necklace or bangle, often featuring stylized heads of animals like rams, lions, or dragons.
  • Textured: Having a surface that is not smooth, but instead features bumps, ridges, or other patterns.
  • Three Stone: A popular ring design featuring three stones arranged in a row along the head of the ring.
  • Tiara: A crown-like head ornament.
  • Tin: A silvery metal used primarily for coating iron to prevent rust.
  • Titanium: A strong, lightweight, silvery-gray metal commonly used in jewelry for its durability and hypoallergenic properties.
  • Toggle Clasp: A fastening mechanism for jewelry consisting of a ring on one end and a short bar on the other that fits through the ring.
  • Tolkowsky, Marcel: A mathematician who defined the ideal proportions for a round brilliant diamond cut to maximize its brilliance.
  • Topaz: A borosilicate mineral valued as a gemstone and known for its various colors.
  • Torsade: A twisted strand of pearls with a clasp closure.
  • Tortoise Shell: A mottled brown shell material used in jewelry for its unique pattern.
  • Tourmaline: A semi-precious gemstone occurring in a wide range of colors and composed of a complex borosilicate.
  • Tracer Band: A wedding or anniversary band designed to fit snugly against an engagement ring.
  • Translucent: Partially transparent, allowing light to pass through but not offering a clear view.
  • Trapezoid Cut: A gemstone cut into a trapezoid shape with one short side, one parallel long side, and two equal ends.
  • Trellis: A prong setting featuring four interwoven prongs holding a central diamond.
  • Tremblant: Jewelry designed to move and tremble when worn, often achieved using elements set on flexible wires.
  • Trillion Cut: A triangular diamond cut with rounded corners and a varying number of facets.
  • Tsavorite: A deep, rich green variety of garnet gemstone.
  • Tubogas: A flexible, tubular chain used in jewelry designs.
  • Tungsten: A heavy, high-melting, hard metal known for its durability and scratch resistance.
  • Turquoise: A semi-precious stone prized for its distinctive blue color.
  • Tutti Frutti: Jewelry featuring multi-colored gemstones carved into shapes like leaves, flowers, and berries, often incorporated into basket designs.
  • Twisted: A band or group of bands with a curved or interwoven design.
  • Two-Tone: Jewelry made with two separate metals, soldered together to create a single piece.

U

  • Ultrasonic: A jewelry cleaning device that uses high-frequency sound waves to remove dirt and debris without damaging the piece.
  • Unique: A jewelry item that is one-of-a-kind and cannot be found elsewhere.
  • Unisex: Jewelry designed to be worn by people of all genders, regardless of their sex or gender identity.

V

  • Vermeil: Jewelry crafted from silver that has been coated with a layer of gold. The thickness of the gold plating is important, as a thicker layer ensures a longer lasting and more durable piece.
  • Victorian: A term used to describe jewelry that was made during the reign of Queen Victoria (1837 to 1901). Victorian jewelry is typically characterized by its elaborate designs, often incorporating precious metals, gemstones, and intricate beadwork.
  • Vintage: Jewelry that is considered to be old, but not antique. Vintage jewelry typically comes from a specific era, such as the Art Deco period or the 1950s, and may feature design elements and materials popular in that era. Vintage jewelry is often valued for its unique style and craftsmanship.

W

  • Wedding: A formal ceremony marking the union of two people in marriage.
  • Wedding Set: A set of two rings, typically consisting of an engagement ring and a wedding band, designed to be worn together.
  • White Gold: An alloy of gold mixed with other metals, such as nickel, palladium, or zinc, resulting in a silvery-white color.
  • White Metal: A general term for any alloy of non-precious metals, often used to create a silvery appearance in jewelry.
  • Wood: A hard, fibrous material forming the main structure of trees and shrubs, sometimes used in jewelry making for its natural beauty and warmth.
  • Woven: A jewelry design element where multiple strands of metal are interlaced and intertwined, creating a unique texture and pattern.
  • Wrist Watch: A small timepiece designed to be worn around the wrist, typically attached to a bracelet or strap.

Y

  • Yellow gold: a precious metal prized for its inherent beauty, boasts a vibrant yellow hue that radiates warmth and elegance. Often paired with copper and silver, it transforms into a versatile material for crafting exquisite jewelry pieces.

Z

  • Zinc: A gleaming silver-white metal belonging to the Magnesium-Cadmium family, valued for its abundance and aesthetic appeal in the world of jewelry.
  • Zircon: A captivating gemstone born from the transformation of common mineral crystals through heating, cutting, and polishing. Its radiant blue-white hue makes it a coveted choice for adorning jewelry.
  • Zoisite: A multifaceted semi-precious gem boasting a spectrum of colors, encompassing blue, violet, green, brown, pink, yellow, gray, and white. Its versatility lends itself to the creation of distinctive and captivating jewelry pieces.

Comprehensive Glossary of Jewelry Terms

Welcome to your tour into the enchantment that is the world of jewelry! You’ll find a treasure mine of phrases here, from timeless classics to recent trends, letting you to confidently traverse the complicated world of gemstones, metals, and creative processes.

Examine the Lexicon:

  • Gemstones: Explore the enthralling world of precious and semi-precious stones, from diamonds’ brilliant brightness to the vibrant hues of sapphires and emeralds. Learn about their origins, qualities, and cuts.
  • Metals: Learn about the many metals used in jewelry manufacturing, each has its own distinct features and attraction. Learn about the distinctions between gold, silver, platinum, and other precious metals, as well as plating and alloying techniques.
  • Design Methodologies: Explore the subtle skill of jewelry design. Discover the various processes used to manufacture stunning pieces, from conventional settings and prongs to cutting-edge casting and carving technologies.
  • Jewelry Styles: Explore the many jewelry styles, from the timeless elegance of traditional designs to fashionable and current interpretations. Learn about how many ages and civilizations impacted the world of jewelry.

Empower your Jewelry Journey:

Our extensive glossary empowers you to:

  • Communicate effectively: Speak confidently with jewelers and designers, expressing your preferences and understanding their terminology.
  • Make informed decisions: Whether purchasing a new piece or designing your own, knowledge is power. By understanding the different elements of jewelry, you can make informed choices that align with your style and budget.
  • Deepen your appreciation: Delving into the history and craftsmanship behind different jewelry pieces allows you to develop a deeper appreciation for their beauty and value.

Uncover the Magic:

Allow your curiosity to take you through the intriguing world of jewelry as you explore our glossary. Discover hidden treasures, learn design secrets, and embark on a voyage of self-expression via the art of decoration. Keep in mind that information is the key to unlocking a treasure trove of beauty and inspiration.

Explore now and embrace the enchanting world of jewelry!